Thursday, October 30, 2014

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Massing of the Colors in Wethersfield, Connecticut



This past Sunday, September 28, I attended the 49th Annual Massing of the Colors of the Hereditary and Patriotic Societies of Connecticut at the First Church of Christ in Wethersfield.  As a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century, both represented at this ceremony, it was my pleasure to attend.







Wethersfield could not have been more 
beautiful on a warm afternoon in late September.    












Before the ceremony I walked around the town and visited the cemetery and the Broad Street green.  I had not realized that there was a memorial plaque to my 12th great-grandmother, Alice (Tiler) Sherwood in the cemetery.        
It is located in the cemetery directly behind the church near the building.

The Ancient Burying Ground



On Broad Street Green I found the memorial monument
for my 12th great-grandfather, Nathaniel Foote, a settler of 
Wethersfield in 1634.  The granite monument is on the site
of the original home lot.  It reads…    

                                                  Nathaniel Foote
                                                   The Settler
                                                    Born in England 1593
                                                  Died in Wethersfield 1644
                                                  Erected By The
                                                  Foote Family Association
                                                  of America
                                                 On the Original Home Lot
                                                 September 7, 1908

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Happy Anniversary

Wedding day, September 9, 1950


Sixty-four years ago today, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, my parents, William Pinchbeck and Wanda Hanlin were married at Ridgeview Congregational Church in White Plains, New York.  

Happy anniversary, Mom and Dad!


Monday, September 8, 2014

Daniel Belden and Elizabeth Foote

Recently I visited Deerfield, Massachusetts to learn more about my tenth great-grandparents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Foote) Belden.  While there I toured the Memorial Hall Museum maintained by the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association.

It contains this memorial to Daniel Belden

In a raid on Deerfield on September 16, 1696 Elizabeth was killed along with several of their children.  Daniel was taken captive with his son Nathaniel and daughter Esther and taken to Canada.  In June 1698 they were released and left Canada for Albany.  After spending three weeks in Albany they went down the Hudson to New York, from there to Stamford, Connecticut and then to family in Norwalk before eventually returning to Deerfield.

Daniel married again on February 17, 1699 to Hepzibah Buell Wells.  On February 29, 1704 she was captured and killed during the French and Indian Raid on Deerfield.  

A memorial to Hepzibah Wells Belden and her daughter, Mary Wells.


After losing two wives, Daniel was married again; this time to Sarah Hawks.  



                                  




Daniel died August 14, 1731 and is buried in the Old Burying Ground on Albany Road in historic Deerfield.














His daughter, Mary, moved to Norwalk where other Belden family members lived, including her uncle, John Belden, after her mother died and her father was captured in 1696.  She married James Trowbridge on April 19, 1698 several months before her father was released from captivity.  My ninth great-grandmother went on to live a life in Wilton Parish as a Deacon's wife that was very different from her parents' life.




Monday, September 1, 2014

Anthony Beers

My immigrant ancestor in my Beers line is Anthony Beers.  My ninth great-grandfather was born in Gravesend, Kent, England about 1611.  He immigrated to Massachusetts Bay around 1644.  By 1646 he was living in Watertown, Massachusetts with his first wife, Elizabeth. He was a member of the Watertown Train Band in 1652 and applied to be designated "free" in Massachusetts in 1657.  His youngest son, Barnabus, was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts.  Eventually Anthony moved to Fairfield, Connecticut where he married Mary Adams, widow of Edward Adams, after 1671.  Anthony died about 1679 when he drowned at sea.  An inventory was taken May 14, 1679 by George Squire and Thomas Wilson.

Children of Anthony Beers and Elizabeth (probably Firmin):

Samuel, born at Watertown, 1647; died young
Ephraim, born at Watertown, 1648 -- my eighth great-grandfather who married Mary Gardner
John, born at Watertown, 1651/2
Esther, born at Watertown, 1654
Samuel, born at Watertown, May 1657; died September 1657
Barnabas, born at Roxbury, 1658
Elizabeth

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Richard Olmstead (1612 - 1687)

Richard Olmstead is the immigrant ancestor in my Olmstead line.  He was born in 1612 in Fairsted, Essex, England and was baptized on February 20th of that year.  In 1632 he sailed from London to Boston with his uncle, James Olmstead, his brother and sister, and members of his uncle's family on the ship Lyon.  Richard settled in Cambridge and in 1636 moved to Hartford as one of its first settlers and original proprietors. He is listed on the Founders Monument located in the Ancient Burying Ground adjacent to Center Church in Hartford.
While in Hartford he served as Constable and fence-viewer.  He served in the military in the Pequot War in 1637.

Richard Olmstead was one of the signers of the agreement for planting Norwalk in June of 1650.  He was a settler of Norwalk, Connecticut and in 1651 owned home lot XV.  He continued his military service in Norwalk as Sergeant, Lieutenant, and, finally, Captain of the Norwalk Train Band.  He was muster master for Fairfield County in November 1673 and served as a Commissioner for Norwalk from 1678 to 1685.  He died early in 1687 in Norwalk.

I am descended from my eleventh great-grandfather through his son James.  Recently I received my membership certificate from The National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century as a descendant of Richard Olmstead.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Marie Warenbuer Ferree

One of my stops during my Pennsylvania road trip was the town of Paradise in Lancaster County where I found Carpenters Cemetery.

My seventh great-grandmother, Marie Warenbuer Ferree, a founder of the Huguenot Colony in Pequea Valley in 1712 is buried there.

Marie and her husband, Daniel Ferree, had six children -- Daniel, Catherine, Mary, John, Phillip, and Jane.  I am descended through her daughter Mary who married Thomas Faulkner in 1715.



Some views from the present day cemetery.